Who are you today?


I’ve been reading Ruth Reichl’s memoir, Garlic and Sapphires: Adventures of a food critic in disguise. Reichl served as food critic for the New York Times, although you may know her, as I do, as a judge on Top Chef. One of the challenges of any food critic is remaining anonymous. Before she even arrived in New York for her interview with the Times, local restaurants had her picture on the wall for employees to see. Of course, if you’re found out a food critic the visit is worthless; you’ll get the very best treatment possible.

When Reichl began working for the times she began getting creative with her disguises. With the help of her friends she began creating not only a disguise but a persona, crafting a story that fit her character. She enjoyed this rather advanced version of playing dress up. What took her by surprise, however, was how different she felt inside the garb of each woman. With some she felt free and outgoing; with others she felt burdened and invisible.

But she didn’t just feel different; she was treated differently. From the doorman of her apartment building to the taxi drivers to the restaurant staff, her interactions varied widely according to her disguise. Sometimes people were eager to engage with her. Other times people are just as eager to hide from her.

All of which made me think: what guises do we put on? As you prepare for the day, do you put on the emotional clothes of the failure and screw-up who can’t do anything right? Do you wear the jacket of a victim who never seems to win? Do you put on confidence or a trusting curiosity about the world?

Just as Reichl discovered, the people we become affects the people we meet.

Tomorrow morning as you prepare for your day, ask yourself: Who am I today? Who do I want to be? Who do I choose to be?


memoir coverI am very pleased to announce that my latest book, I Don’t Remember Signing Up for This Class is now available in paperback through Amazon. Here’s what some people are saying about it:

“This book is riveting, powerful, and most of all hopeful. I read it in one day, but know it will stay with me for a long time.” (Anonymous amazon review – 5 stars)

“Peggy Haymes offers a vision of grace sorely needed in our wounded culture.” (Dr. Molly T. Marshall)

“It is a courageous and witty account of triumphantly and gracefully meeting life’s challenges.” (Dr. Brian Gersho)

“Truth-telling at its most authentic, heart-wrenching and life-affirming fills these pages.” (Rev. Alicia Porterfield)

Read more here.

Order your copy here


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